The Conservation Conversation: Bite-size Brexit

Perspectives from Stirling Biological & Environmental Sciences on how Brexit may affect our research, and what we can do about it…

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EU flag. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Biological and Environmental Sciences (BES) here at Stirling is full of international researchers and collaborations. Since the Brexit vote, there has been uncertainty over how we, as UK- and non-UK, EU- and non-EU nationals, will continue to work on EU-funded projects, begin new international collaborations, and remain as residents in the UK. Continue reading

Planet Earth II: why most animals can’t hack city living

Kirsty Park, University of Stirling

The grand finale of the BBC’s Planet Earth II showcased the ingenious strategies that some animals use to thrive in urban environments. Though impressive, these species are in the minority. As the number of people living in cities around the world continues to rise, we should really be turning our attention to those animals that find city living too hard to handle. Continue reading

Mosquito nets are often used for fishing. A smart response is needed

Emma Bush, University of Stirling and Rebecca Short, Zoological Society of London

mnf_man2The human race is extremely resourceful, particularly when resources are limited. Inevitably, when poor rural communities are given access to a new asset they will find a number of uses for them. Anti-malarial bednets – the fine-mesh nets used to protect people from mosquito bites while they sleep – are a good case in point.

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Pesticide-related confusion in pollinators and politicians

By Penelope Whitehorn

“I arrived confused about this topic and I will leave as confused as ever.” This was the parting comment from the only MP in the room and not the outcome we were hoping for! The event was a scientific briefing about neonicotinoid pesticides and pollinators, organised by the Soil Association in a classy venue in Westminster. Unfortunately, such confusion seems typical of the political response to an issue that has generated passionate controversy in many other sections of society. Continue reading

Call for applications – ICN Workshop 2016

Applications now being received for the 2016 Interdisciplinary Conservation Network (ICN) workshop!

ICN 2016 flyer_updated

Date of workshop: 26-28 June 2016
Application deadline: 31 March 2016

The Interdisciplinary Centre for Conservation Science (ICCS), Stirling Conservation Science (STI-CS) and the Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science (CBCS) are pleased to invite PhD students and early-career researchers in the field of conservation science to apply to participate in a three-day workshop to be held at the University of Oxford, UK.

The aim of this workshop is to provide early-career researchers with an opportunity to collaborate with other researchers from around the world, including leading figures in their field, and to learn key skills for the development of their careers.

More information about the workshop and how to apply is available here.

What species would become dominant on Earth if humans died out?

Luc Bussiere, University of Stirling

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

In a post-apocalyptic future, what might happen to life if humans left the scene? After all, humans are very likely to disappear long before the sun expands into a red giant and exterminates all living things from the Earth. Continue reading